Small firms ‘more likely to fall for illegal software’

Small companies are more likely to use unlicenced software because they do not have the resources to look at IT compliance, it has been claimed.


Small companies are more likely to use unlicenced software because they do not have the resources to look at IT compliance, it has been claimed.

Small companies are more likely to use unlicenced software because they do not have the resources to look at IT compliance, it has been claimed.

Recent research published by the trade group Business Software Alliance (BSA) found that London companies install pirated software worth £149 million each year.

Julian Swan, director of compliance marketing for Europe, the Middle East and Africa at the organisation, claims that it is the city’s smaller firms which tend to be at the root of this problem.

He explains that that software compliance is less of a priority for enterprises which employ a few people than it is for larger companies which have the ability to staff a full IT department.

However, Swan adds: ‘It’s not necessarily a deliberate act by any means. The trouble is that doesn’t mean that it’s not illegal.’

Alyna Cope, spokesperson for the BSA country committee, also points out that being caught with unlicenced applications puts companies at risk of legal action and she urges them to perform regular software audits.

In addition, Cope claims that piracy often has a wider impact on research and development in the software industry, adding that start-ups and smaller technology companies often bear the greatest financial burden.

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