Promoting from within

The average cost of bringing in a new employee is £4,500 to £8,000, according to figures from the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development. So it’s no surprise that promoting internally is popular with employers.


The average cost of bringing in a new employee is £4,500 to £8,000, according to figures from the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development. So it’s no surprise that promoting internally is popular with employers.

The average cost of bringing in a new employee is £4,500 to £8,000, according to figures from the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development. So it’s no surprise that promoting internally is popular with employers.

Natasha Pittman, HR director of marketing agency Gyro International, says that apart from the cost savings, promoting from within is vital to sustaining the company’s culture.

‘We probably promote people slightly before they’re ready,’ she reveals, adding that external coaches are brought in to plug any gaps in their experience. ‘We’d rather do that than lose somebody with potential because they get itchy feet.’

Pittman adds that one woman who joined Gyro as an account executive nine years ago now heads the company’s newly opened Dubai office.

According to Simon Jones, acting CEO of Investors in People, internal promotion improves team morale, keeps valuable knowledge inside the company, and saves cash. It’s also a natural strategy for any company that prioritises its employees’ development.

Jones does have one word of warning. If you compare external with internal candidates, it’s vital to establish a level playing field as otheriwseyou could be accused of bias. The only way to do that is to measure each candidate against requirements you have clearly set out in advance.

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